HELLO FROM HENRY

MEET HENRY THE BOX TURTLE

Henry David Thoreau was adopted by Nashville Wildlife Conservation Center after being deemed non-releasable at Walden’s Puddle. Our best guess is that he was taken in as a pet after someone’s dog attacked him. He was kept as an aquatic turtle (he is a land turtle) and passed around for years. By the time he came to us, no one knew where he came from, and thus he could not be released. Turtles have a very small home range, and if they are taken out of it, they can spend the rest of their lives looking for their home. He also suffered shell and limb damage from improper husbandry. He now resides in a happy enclosure, full of things to explore, and dirt to dig in. He brings joy to students throughout Nashville and teaches them the importance of wildlife, and the importance of leaving them in their home.

Invite Henry to your school today.

DID YOU KNOW?

Click below to learn more cool facts about box turtles!

FACT #1
They get their name from their shell which has a hinge, enabling it to close completely, protecting the turtle from predators.
FACT #2
These little guys grow to only 22 cm long.  It’s hard to tell the males from the females, but one way is to look at their eyes.  Most males have red or dark orange eyes, while the females have yellowish-brown eyes.
FACT #3

In hot weather, they use saliva to keep their head and front legs cool and wee on their back legs to keep them cool. 

FACT #4
They are the official reptile of three U.S. states, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Missouri.
FACT #5
There are six sub-species of common box turtles, living throughout the U.S. and Mexico.  They were once widespread and considered common, but are now vulnerable to extinction due to habitat loss, getting run over by cars and being illegally collected for the pet trade.
CITE – Poke, | Darren. “5 Interesting Facts About Common Box Turtles.” Hayden’s Animal Facts, 22 Aug. 2014, haydensanimalfacts.com/2014/08/22/5-interesting-facts-about-common-box-turtles/

SEE WHAT HENRY HAS BEEN UP TO.

NWCC

Nashville Wildlife Conservation is a 501(c)3, dedicated to providing quality science and environmental education to students in underserved communities. By providing environmental education programs, we help increase the quality of science education while making education more applicable to students.

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