HARRIET SAYS HoO

 

MEET HARRIET THE BARRED OWL

Harriet came to Walden’s Puddle as a nestling Barred Owl with juvenile cataracts (a medical condition that results in blurred vision). She was adopted by NWCC in May and was named after the abolitionist and naturalist, Harriet Tubman. As a Barred Owl, she is naturally curious, and loves bathing in water and playing with toys.

Invite Harriet to your school today.

 

DID YOU KNOW?

 

Click on the facts below to learn more about barred owls!

FACT #1
The Great Horned Owl is the most serious predatory threat to the Barred Owl. Although the two species often live in the same areas, a Barred Owl will move to another part of its territory when a Great Horned Owl is nearby.
FACT #2

Barred Owls don’t migrate, and they don’t even move around very much. Of 158 birds that were banded and then found later, none had moved farther than 6 miles away.

FACT #3

Young Barred Owls can climb trees by grasping the bark with their bill and talons, flapping their wings, and walking their way up the trunk.

FACT #4

The oldest recorded Barred Owl was at least 24 years, 1 month old. It was band in Minnesota in 1986 and found dead, entangled in fishing gear, in the same state in 2010.

FACT #5

Pleistocene fossils of Barred Owls, at least 11,000 years old, have been dug up in Florida, Tennessee, and Ontario.

CITE – “Barred Owl.” , Life History, All About Birds – Cornell Lab of Ornithology, www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Barred_Owl/lifehistory#.

SEE WHAT HARRIET HAS BEEN UP TO.

 

NWCC

Nashville Wildlife Conservation is a 501(c)3, dedicated to providing quality science and environmental education to students in underserved communities. By providing environmental education programs, we help increase the quality of science education while making education more applicable to students.

COPYRIGHT © 2018, Nashville Wildlife Conservation Center